Call For A Free Consultation: 913-721-6067

Tips for consistent household rules for children after divorce

Some divorced Kansas parents may be concerned about how to make sure children continue to have stability and consistency despite having to move between two households. Parents should make an effort to set aside their differences and put the well-being of their children first after a divorce. This may mean sitting down with the other parent and working toward a compromise on issues such as bedtimes, time spent playing video games and junk food. It may help if parents decide ahead of time what issues they are willing to compromise on and what issues are so important for them that they will not budge.

Parents who cannot compromise on consistent household rules have other resources that might help them reach an agreement. One of those options is a parenting class. Family law courts, attorneys or therapists may all be able to direct parents toward such a class. While these classes are unbiased toward the parents, some of them do make an effort to show what parenting norms are and point out the damage that can be done to children when parents contradict one another. A mediator who helps parents reach a compromise is another option.

As a last resort, parents can also return to court. However, this means giving up control of the situation and leaving the decision with a judge.

In a few situations, going to a judge about parenting issues after divorce is the best choice or might even be necessary. If a parent is worried about a child's well-being because of the other parent's substance abuse, that parent may want to gather evidence to present to the court. Legally binding agreements, such as child support agreements, must also be changed through the court even if both parents agree to it.

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information

Schedule A Free Consultation

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy